Aerokinesis

The light touch of a breeze, the rising power of a gust and the overwhelming force of a hurricane are as familiar to you as close friends. Somehow you have learned the patterns of air and can channel its mysterious strength with little more than a hand motion.

“In dealing with an obstacle, if it cannot be moved, look for a way around.”
Way of the Air, (Author Unknown). 2E, ~12374

“Aerokinesis is the ability to move, direct, and capture the natural force of air. Far from heavy handed, the power comes from creating openings in opponents through ingenious ways that confuse and out-maneuver them. While other ways may focus on doing the most damage or avoiding confrontation completely, the way of air focuses on rushing in like a gust and then seemingly to vanish before the attack can be countered. In this way the Aerokinetic combines speed, ingenuity, balance and mind.”
Martial Arts of the Elements, Heythikutuck Vos DE’nack’leee. 3E, 1776

“Through the tenets of speed, evasion, and quick thinking, an Aerokinetic becomes one with their element and may even take on the qualities and mannerisms of air themselves. They appear, at first glance, to be slim, if not wasting away. It is as if the very act of standing is somehow a burden and they will often lounge, or lean, or slouch whenever able, yet they never seem to stay in the same place for more than a scarce moment. They may decide rather than opening a garden gate, to simply vault over it and at the same time tire themselves on opening a jar of their favorite snack. In all things they carry themselves with a certain lightness. More often than not it is such that an Aerokenetic can pass through a great echoey hall and never be heard to make an actual step. Their light step conjures the image of an Aerokenetic temple where the monks (in effort to have gentle conversation) end up in a state of constant surprise at each encounter with one another. Despite what curiosity they create for themselves, never have there been a more tenacious, quick witted, and carefree being than the true aerokinetic.”
Philosophies of the Elements, Poss Vechn. 3E, 2204